How the Future of Information Works Today

In Act One, you take a nightmare television moment, beginning approximately at 3 minutes, 30 seconds into this video.

And if you are Texas State Senator Kirk Watson, you do not want to become a household name this week. Even Keith Olbermann’s gentle intervention after the interview (6 minutes, 15 seconds into the video) doesn’t save your face — especially when Chris Matthews was parading your scalp on MSNBC’s Morning Joe today. That’s Act Two.

Implicitly, Chris Matthews also was parading his current nyah nyah meme: Barack Obama is a lightweight. Expect that to continue.

Once upon a time, when information came one-way through print, radio, and television, characters such as Chris Matthews could make ya or break ya.  The Matthews message regarding Obama — “he’s a cipher in a suit” — becomes the generally accepted knowledge, only to be corrected much later, if at all. For instance,

note 1: Al Gore never said he invented the internet.
note 2: John Kerry really did perform heroically in Viet Nam.

Today differs from 2000 and even 2004 in that the idea of  Smart Mobs, such a novel concept four years ago, has become commonplace today. If you double-click the video link above you’ll go straight to the video on You Tube, where you can find comments outlining Senator Obama’s many accomplishments.

Additionally, a diarist at Daily Kos wasted no time taking exception to Matthew’s ambush, and commenters quickly provided links to Barack Obama’s record of accomplishments here, here, and here.

The upshot is that the more Matthews and his ilk push the Obama-as-empty-suit meme, the more smart mobs will push back with contradictory facts, perhaps actually building Barack Obama’s credibility, as the counter-meme spreads.

Thus may the days of mass-mediated communication be drawing to a close.

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One response to “How the Future of Information Works Today

  1. Pingback: Presidential election 2008 |Republicans Vs. Democrats » How the Future of Information Works Today

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